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Oklahoma Sex Offender Rules Explained

Updated: Feb 2, 2023


Oklahoma's Sex Offender Registration Act (SORA) was enacted in 1989 and requires anyone convicted of a sex offense to register with the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation (OSBI). The law has since been amended several times, most recently in 2019.


Under SORA, sex offenders must provide their name, address, date of birth, Social Security number, place of employment, level of offense, and a photograph to the OSBI. They must also update this information every year or whenever they move. Failure to comply with SORA is a felony offense.


The 2019 amendment to SORA made several changes to the law, including expanding the definition of "sex offender" to include people who have been convicted of certain crimes in other states that are similar to Oklahoma's sex offenses. The amendment also requires people who are required to register as sex offenders to provide their email addresses, instant messaging screen names, and social media user names to the OSBI.


Upon conviction of a sex crime, the defendant is assigned a Numeric Risk Level. Oklahoma has three risk levels:

- Level 1 (low): The offender poses a low risk of re-offending.


- Level 2 (moderate): The offender poses a moderate risk of re-offending.


- Level 3 (high): The offender poses a high risk of re-offending and is a threat to public safety.


The level is determined by the Oklahoma Department of Corrections using a risk assessment tool. The Numeric Risk Level is then used to determine how long the offender must remain on the sex offender registry.


Level 1 offenders must register for 15 years. They can petition the court for early removal after 10 years if they have not been convicted of another crime during that time.


Level 2 offenders must register for 25 years. They can petition the court for early removal after 20 years if they have not been convicted of another crime during that time.


Level 3 offenders are required to register for life. They can petition the court for early removal after 25 years if they have not been convicted of another crime during that time and if they can show that they no longer pose a threat to public safety.


Some sex offenders are also subject to Oklahoma's Habitual Offender Act, which requires them to register as sex offenders for life. The Habitual Offender Act applies to people who have been convicted of two or more felonies, one of which is a sex offense.


Oklahoma's sex offender registry is public information and is accessible online. The registry includes the offender's name, address, date of birth, physical description, offense, and risk level. It also includes a photograph of the offender, if one is available.


Oklahoma's SORA law is one of the most stringent in the country and provides little leeway for those who fail to comply with its requirements.


Oklahoma's sex offender registry laws are designed to protect the public from sex offenders. These laws are strict and failure to comply can result in serious consequences. If you have been convicted of a sex offense, it is important that you understand your obligations under SORA and comply with the law.


 

Meason & Ramsey Law provides a professional experience for all our clients, helping them navigate their legal rights. Our focus is criminal law (felony and misdemeanors). We specialize in Criminal Law, Divorce and Family Law, Probate Law. We are currently accepting cases in Washington, Nowata and Osage counties. Meason & Ramsey Law has family lawyers, divorce lawyers, probate lawyers, criminal defense lawyers, DUI & DWI lawyers, co-counsel lawyers, family attorneys, divorce attorneys, probate attorneys, criminal defense attorneys, DUI & DWI attorneys and co-counsel attorneys. Marty Meason and Rodney D. Ramsey, Attorneys


Meason & Ramsey Law

515 Delaware Ave

Bartlesville, OK 74003

918-336-6300



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